Pumpkin Spice Latte Chia Seed Pudding

I always find chia pudding hard to get right and it often ends up not tasting much, so I’m definitely trying this recipe from vegetarian snob out this weekend. I mean how can anything with pumpkin be anything but delicious…

pumpkinspicecoconutmilkpour

Ingredients
  • 1-2 shots of espresso (or ¼-½ cup of brewed coffee)
  • ½ cup canned coconut milk
  • 2 Tbl of pumpkin puree
  • 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
  • ½ tsp of ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp maple syrup (or sweetener of your choice)
  • ¼ cup of chia seeds
Directions
  1. Begin by making your shots of espresso or brewing your coffee.
  2. You could probably just throw everything in your jar or bowl and stir, but I always miscalculate how much space my jar can handle, so I suggest making your pumpkin spice latte separately then pouring the whole thing over your chia seeds.
  3. Pour your coffee into a large mug/bowl and add in your coconut milk (if you want to sneak sips before making your pudding, warm your milk up!). Stir until your coffee is creamy.
  4. Add in your pumpkin puree, pumpkin pie spice, cinnamon, vanilla, and maple syrup (or whichever sweetener you’re using), and stir until your coffee is well mixed and everything is incorporated. Try it here. Taste for spice, sugar, and creaminess.
  5. Add your chia seeds to an empty jar (my preferred method) or bowl, and pour over your pumpkin spiced latte!
  6. Stir, or shake vigorously so that the seeds don’t all clump together. Once your seeds are all independent and non-sticky, seal your jar or cover your bowl.
  7. Place in the fridge to let the chia seeds absorb the liquid and puff up, for about 3 hours, or preferably, overnight. The longer you wait, the larger the chia seeds will get and the thicker the pudding.
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Pumpkin Spice and Random Thoughts

Since moving to Australia the hardest part for me is not missing friends and family (I love you) but that the season are turned upside down. You would think that going from our lovely European summer into the Australian one would be great, and in some ways it is, but christmas without snow? Thats just wrong! And since autumn is my absolute favorite season off all time (closely followed by spring) I’m having crazy autumn cravings. Orange leaves, sweaters, hot tea you name it. And especially gingerbread and pumpkin spice. (I just spelled it pumking, that how much I love it)

Since gingerbread takes forever to make (who has time for overnight in the fridge) I’m going with pumpkin spice easy breasy… (while looking for a pumpkin spice recipe I stumbled on to this recipe… OMG it look’s so good!!)

IMG_4977

 

– from Country Clever

How to and what you need:

3 Tbsp Cinnamon
4 tsp Ground Ginger
2 tsp Ground Cloves
1 tsp Ground Nutmeg

Put all ingredients in an air tight container and shake!! (Or you could do it the “normal” way and mix with a spoon..)

Apple Cider Caramels

Apple Cider Caramels
From The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook

Apple cider (sometimes called sweet or “soft” cider), as I’m referring to it here, is different from both apple juice and the hard, or alcoholic, fermented apple cider. It’s a fresh, unfiltered (it has sediment), raw apple juice — the juice literally pressed from fresh apples. It’s unpasteurized, and must be refrigerated, because it’s perishable. In the Northeast, I usually find it at farm stands and some grocery stores. I occasionally find vacuum- sealed bottles called apple cider in the juice aisle, but none of the bottled varieties that I’ve tried has the same delicate apple flavor as the more perishable stuff sold in the refrigerator section.

4 cups (945 ml) apple cider
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons flaky sea salt, such as Maldon, or less of a finer one
8 tablespoons (115 grams or 1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into chunks
1 cup (200 grams) granulated sugar
1/2 cup (110 grams) packed light brown sugar
1/3 cup (80 ml) heavy cream
Neutral oil for the knife

Boil the apple cider in a 3- to- 4- quart saucepan over high heat until it is reduced to a dark, thick syrup, between 1/3 and 1/2 cup in volume. This takes about 35 to 40 minutes on my stove. Stir occasionally.

Meanwhile, get your other ingredients in order, because you won’t have time to spare once the candy is cooking. Line the bottom and sides of an 8- inch straight- sided square metal baking pan with 2 long sheets of crisscrossed parchment. Set it aside. Stir the cinnamon and flaky salt together in a small dish.

Once you are finished reducing the apple cider, remove it from the heat and stir in the butter, sugars, and heavy cream. Return the pot to medium- high heat with a candy thermometer attached to the side, and let it boil until the thermometer reads 252 degrees, only about 5 minutes. Keep a close eye on it.

(Don’t have a candy or deep- fry thermometer? Have a bowl of very cold water ready, and cook the caramel until a tiny spoonful dropped into the water becomes firm, chewy, and able to be plied into a ball.)

Immediately remove caramel from heat, add the cinnamon- salt mixture, and give the caramel several stirs to distribute it evenly. Pour caramel into the prepared pan. Let it sit until cool and firm—about 2 hours, though it goes faster in the fridge. Once caramel is firm, use your parchment paper sling to transfer the block to a cutting board. Use a well- oiled knife, oiling it after each cut (trust me!), to cut the caramel into 1-by-1-inch squares. Wrap each one in a 4-inch square of waxed paper, twisting the sides to close. Caramels will be somewhat on the soft side at room temperature, and chewy/firm from the fridge.

Do ahead: Caramels keep, in an airtight container at room temperature, for two weeks, but really, good luck with that.